June 18, 2020

Legends of the Dark Knight's Editor

Legends of the Dark Knight's Editor

On the comic book edition, DC drops Diamond, Marvel has issues with a Chinese trademark and we remember one of the greats Denny O’Neil all that and more on this edition of multiverse tonight.

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Transcript

Tonight!,DC drops Diamond, Marvel has issues with a Chinese trademark and we remember one of the greats Denny O’Neil all that and more on this edition of multiverse tonight.



Welcome to episode 81 of Multiverse Tonight. The news floodgates have started to open and boy is there controversy. There are even some people who think that AT&T might be getting ready to cut DC Comics loose. This comes after AT&T is looking for a buyer for Warner Bros Games. My guess would be no as the Intellectual Property is worth too much.  While we’re speaking of DC, let’s start with the DC News.




DC

DC had a busy couple of weeks, starting with Batwoman and going to our first story.

DC Comics has ended it’s 25 year distribution relationship with Diamond, the largest distributor in comics. During the pandemic, Diamond distribution was forced to briefly shut down, DC decided to use alternate distributors Lunar Distribution, owned by DCBS and UCS Comic Distributors owned by New York City’s Midtown Comics. DC will also use Penguin random House for distribution help.  A DC Representative told Comicbook dot com in a statement quote  "After 25 years, DC and Diamond Comic Distributors are ending their long-standing relationship," a DC representative told ComicBook.com in a statement. "Moving forward, comic book retailers can obtain their DC books from Penguin Random House, or their books and periodicals through Lunar or UCS comic book distributors. DC continues to be committed to providing the Direct Market with best in class service and the fans with the world's greatest comic books." unquote   The hows haven’t been announced yet. But most likely Penguin would distribute the graphic novels and collected editions and USC and Lunar would distribute the single issues. Now some retailers have reacted badly to the news, frankly, I think it’s too early to say anything yet. This could be a good thing, this could be bad, it’s a big thing.


And in some news that just broke yesterday, DC and Diamond have extended their agreement to fulfill orders of in-stock comic periodicals previously offered for sale, fulfilling reorders through July 31.


This extension of their agreement means that local comic shops can order back issues of any DC comic released before June 23 through Diamond at least through the end of July. Order fulfillment will depend on whether Diamond has copies available. Additionally, when it comes to graphic novels or collections, retailers will be able to order books that were offered through Diamond for Final Order Cut-off June 1 or before through mid-December of this year. For shops serviced by Diamond U.K., orders for new and backlist DC offerings can be ordered through the end of 2020.


The other big news is that there’s gonna be a new Batwoman in town as the showrunners for BatWoman have decided not to recast the role of Kate Kane, but instead create a brand new character. A casting notice was discovered by fans on Reddit but was quickly pulled down. According to the casting call the character of Ryan Wider quote "is about to become Batwoman. She's likable, messy, a little goofy, and untamed. She's also nothing like Kate Kane, the woman who wore the batsuit before her. With no one in her life to keep her on track, Ryan spent years as a drug-runner, dodging the GCPD and masking her pain with bad habits. A girl who would steal milk for an alley cat could also kill you with her bare hands, Ryan is the most dangerous type of fighter: highly skilled and wildly undisciplined. An out lesbian. Athletic. Raw. Passionate. Fallible. And very much not your stereotypical All-American hero." unquote 


However it doesn’t mean the character of Kate Kane is dead Showrunneer Caroline Dries said in a statement quote "As a lesbian who’s been working as a writer for the past fifteen years, I’m well aware of the 'Bury Your Gays' trope and I have no interest in participating in it," said Dries. "That’s why it’s important to me as the showrunner to clarify any misinformation out there about Kate Kane and recasting Batwoman. Like you, I love Kate Kane — she’s the reason I wanted to do the show. We’ll never erase her. In fact, her disappearance will be one of the mysteries of season two. I don’t want to give away any of our surprises, but to all our devoted fans, please know that LGBTQ+ justice is at the very core of what Batwoman is and we have no intention of abandoning that." unquote 


By the way, just an observation,  Wonder Woman 1984 would have been in theaters right now. It’s very interesting in stores right now as all the merchandising is there, but the movie isn’t going to be out for a long time. It’s been pushed back to October second.


Superman will be getting a new villain in September’s Superman issue 25. Synmar is a warrior created to be the standard-bearer for an alien race from the deep in outer space. Here’s the blurb, quote "A colossal new threat to Superman, the planet Earth, and the DC Universe arrives on the scene in this extra-sized anniversary issue!," "This unique warrior called the Synmar was created to represent an entire alien race. He’s trained his entire life — but for what purpose? As the antithesis of everything Superman stands for, Synmar launches his aggression toward Earth — to destroy the Man of Steel and every being on the planet! This is what Superman was born to protect us from!" unquote Sounds interesting.


Marvel

Marvel has a dispute on its hands, the WandaVision trademark has been challenged by Wanda Group, a Hong Kong based company. Wanda Group, according to Wikipedia is a Chinese multinational conglomerate based in Beijing. It is a private property developer and owner of Wanda Cinemas and the Hoyts Group, as well as a majority shareholder of AMC Theatres. It would be unclear how WandaVision the marvel show could be confused with Wanda Group the company, but I guess this is a matter for the courts. Watch this space.


Well while they wait, may it’s time to start filming again. Paul Bettany, the actor who plays Vision in the show has canceled a convention appearance at the Tampa Bay Comic-Con, They facebook post for the cancelation says quote “We finally received word from Paul Bettany's representation, and unfortunately Paul had to cancel his appearance at TBCC this year due being called back by Disney for WandaVision filming in July, in Los Angeles. We're working on guest additions!” unquote. So it sounds like a good chance, rumors are also abounding that The Falcon and The Winter Soldier might be picking up filming soon too. 


The spider-man Into The Spider-Verse Sequel has begun production. Lead Animator Nick Kondo shared the teaser trailer on twitter with the post quote First Day on the job! Unquote However, it’s a long ways off, it won’t be in theaters until 2022.


While we’re waiting for 2021 will be a big year for Sony with lots of movies banked up because of the coronavirus. Sony revealed that Uncharted, Ghostbusters Afterlife, Uncharted, and Morbius will all be available in IMAX next year. 



Geek. 

The Eisner Award nominations have been announced. IDW and Image lead the way with thirteen nominations for IDW and eleven for IDW.


The awards are normally handed out at San Diego Comic-con, however, that’s not gonna happen with the con canceled this year. However, the organizers have announced that the results will be revealed some time in July. The full list of nominees will be available in the show notes.

The full list of nominations is below.

Best Short Story

“Hot Comb,” by Ebony Flowers, in Hot Comb (Drawn & Quarterly)

“How to Draw a Horse,” by Emma Hunsinger, The New Yorker, https://www.newyorker.com/humor/daily-shouts/how-to-draw-a-horse

“The Menopause,” by Mira Jacob, The Believer, https://believermag.com/the-menopause/

“Who Gets Called an ‘Unfit’ Mother?” by Miriam Libicki, The Nib, https://thenib.com/who-gets-called-an-unfit-mother/

“You’re Not Going to Believe What I’m About to Tell You,” by Matthew Inman, The Oatmeal, https://theoatmeal.com/comics/believe

Best Single Issue/One-Shot

Coin-Op No. 8: Infatuation, by Peter and Maria Hoey (Coin-Op Books)

The Freak, by Matt Lesniewski (AdHouse)

Minotäar, by Lissa Treiman (Shortbox)

Our Favorite Thing Is My Favorite Thing Is Monsters, by Emil Ferris (Fantagraphics)

Sobek, by James Stokoe (Shortbox)

Best Continuing Series

Bitter Root, by David Walker, Chuck Brown, and Sanford Greene (Image)

Criminal, by Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips (Image)

Crowded, by Christopher Sebela, Ro Stein, and Ted Brandt (Image)

Daredevil, by Chip Zdarsky and Marco Checchetto (Marvel)

The Dreaming, by Simon Spurrier, Bilquis Evely et al. (DC)

Immortal Hulk, by Al Ewing, Joe Bennett, and Ruy José et al. (Marvel)

Best Limited Series

Ascender, by Jeff Lemire and Dustin Nguyen (Image)

Ghost Tree, by Bobby Curnow and Simon Gane (IDW)

Little Bird by Darcy Van Poelgeest and Ian Bertram (Image)

Naomi by Brian Michael Bendis, David Walker, and Jamal Campbell (DC)

Sentient, by Jeff Lemire and Gabriel Walta (TKO)

Best New Series

Doctor Doom, by Christopher Cantwell and Salvador Larocca (Marvel)

Invisible Kingdom, by G. Willow Wilson and Christian Ward (Berger Books/Dark Horse)

Once & Future, by Kieron Gillen and Dan Mora (BOOM! Studios)

Something Is Killing the Children, by James Tynion IV and Werther Dell’Edera (BOOM! Studios)

Undiscovered Country, by Scott Snyder, Charles Soule, Giuseppe Camuncoli, and Daniele Orlandini (Image)

Best Publication for Early Readers

Comics: Easy as ABC, by Ivan Brunetti (TOON)

Kitten Construction Company: A Bridge Too Fur, by John Patrick Green (First Second/Macmillan)

The Pigeon HAS to Go to School! by Mo Willems (Hyperion Books)

A Trip to the Top of the Volcano with Mouse, by Frank Viva (TOON)

¡Vamos! Let's Go to the Market, by Raúl the Third (Versify/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

Who Wet My Pants? by Bob Shea and Zachariah Ohora (Little, Brown)

Best Publication for Kids

Akissi: More Tales of Mischief, by Marguerite Abouet and Mathieu Sapin (Flying Eye/Nobrow)

Dog Man: For Whom the Ball Rolls, by Dav Pilkey (Scholastic Graphix)

Guts, by Raina Telgemeier (Scholastic Graphix)

New Kid, by Jerry Craft (Quill Tree/HarperCollins)

This Was Our Pact, by Ryan Andrews (First Second/Macmillan)

The Wolf in Underpants, by Wilfrid Lupano, Mayana Itoïz, and Paul Cauuet (Graphic Universe/Lerner Publishing Group)

Best Publication for Teens

Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass, by Mariko Tamaki and Steve Pugh (DC)

Hot Comb, by Ebony Flowers (Drawn & Quarterly)

Kiss Number 8, by Colleen AF Venable and Ellen T. Crenshaw (First Second/Macmillan)

Laura Dean Keeps Breaking Up with Me, by Mariko Tamaki and Rosemary Valero-O'Connell (First Second/Macmillan)

Penny Nichols, by MK Reed, Greg Means, and Matt Wiegle (Top Shelf)

Best Humor Publication  

Anatomy of Authors, by Dave Kellett (SheldonComics.com)

Death Wins a Goldfish, by Brian Rea (Chronicle Books)

Minotäar, by Lissa Treiman (Shortbox)

Sobek, by James Stokoe (Shortbox)

The Way of the Househusband, vol. 1, by Kousuke Oono, translation by Sheldon Drzka (VIZ Media)

Wondermark: Friends You Can Ride On, by David Malki (Wondermark)

Best Anthology

ABC of Typography, by David Rault (SelfMade Hero)

Baltic Comics Anthology š! #34-37, edited by David Schilter, Sanita Muižniece et al. (kuš!)

Drawing Power: Women’s Stories of Sexual Violence, Harassment, and Survival, edited by Diane Noomin (Abrams)

Kramer’s Ergot #10, edited by Sammy Harkham (Fantagraphics)

The Nib #2–4, edited by Matt Bors (Nib)

Best Reality-Based Work

Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversations, by Mira Jacob (One World/Random House)

Grass, by Keum Suk Gendry-Kim, translation by Janet Hong (Drawn & Quarterly)

Kid Gloves: Nine Months of Careful Chaos, by Lucy Knisley (First Second/Macmillan)

Moonbound: Apollo 11 and the Dream of Spaceflight, by Jonathan Fetter-Vorm (Hill & Wang)

My Solo Exchange Diary, vol. 2 (sequel to My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness), by Nagata Kabi, translation by Jocelyne Allen (Seven Seas)

They Called Us Enemy, by George Takei, Justin Eisinger, Steven Scott, and Harmony Becker (Top Shelf)

Best Graphic Album—New

Are You Listening? by Tillie Walden (First Second/Macmillan)

Bezimena, by Nina Bunjevac (Fantagraphics)

BTTM FDRS, by Ezra Claytan Daniels and Ben Passmore (Fantagraphics)

Life on the Moon, by Robert Grossman (Yoe Books/IDW)

New World, by David Jesus Vignolli (Archaia/BOOM!)

Reincarnation Stories, by Kim Deitch (Fantagraphics)

Best Graphic Album—Reprint

Bad Weekend by Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips (Image)

Clyde Fans, by Seth (Drawn & Quarterly)

Cover, vol. 1, by Brian Michael Bendis and David Mack (DC/Jinxworld)

Glenn Ganges: The River at Night, by Kevin Huizenga (Drawn & Quarterly)

LaGuardia, by Nnedi Okorafor and Tana Ford (Berger Books/Dark Horse)

Rusty Brown, by Chris Ware (Pantheon)

Best Adaptation from Another Medium

Giraffes on Horseback Salad: Salvador Dali, the Marx Brothers, and the Strangest Movie Never Made, by Josh Frank, Tim Hedecker, and Manuela Pertega (Quirk Books)

The Giver, by Lois Lowry and P. Craig Russell, (HMH Books for Young Readers)

The Handmaid’s Tale: The Graphic Novel, by Margaret Atwood, adapted by Renee Nault (Nan A. Talese)

HP Lovecraft’s At the Mountains of Madness, vols. 1–2, adapted by Gou Tanabe, translation by Zack Davisson (Dark Horse Manga)

The Seventh Voyage, by Stanislaw Lem, adapted by Jon Muth, translation by Michael Kandel (Scholastic Graphix)

Snow, Glass, Apples, by Neil Gaiman and Colleen Doran (Dark Horse Books)

Best U.S. Edition of International Material

Diabolical Summer, by Thierry Smolderen and Alexandre Clerisse, translation by Edward Gauvin (IDW)

Gramercy Park, by Timothée de Fombelle and Christian Cailleaux, translation by Edward Gauvin (EuroComics/IDW)

The House, by Paco Roca, translation by Andrea Rosenberg (Fantagraphics)

Maggy Garrisson, by Lewis Trondheim and Stéphane Oiry, translation by Emma Wilson (SelfMadeHero)

Stay, by Lewis Trondheim and Hubert Chevillard, translation by Mike Kennedy (Magnetic Press)

Wrath of Fantômas, by Olivier Bouquet and Julie Rocheleau, translation by Edward Gauvin (Titan)

Best U.S. Edition of International Material—Asia

BEASTARS, by Paru Itagaki, translation by Tomo Kimura (VIZ Media)

Cats of the Louvre, by Taiyo Matsumoto, translation by Michael Arias (VIZ Media)

Grass, by Keum Suk Gendry-Kim, translation by Janet Hong (Drawn & Quarterly)

Magic Knight Rayearth 25th Anniversary Edition, by CLAMP, translation by Melissa Tanaka (Kodansha)

The Poe Clan, by Moto Hagio, translation by Rachel Thorn (Fantagraphics)

Witch Hat Atelier, by Kamome Shirahama, translation by Stephen Kohler (Kodansha)

Best Archival Collection/Project—Strips

Cham: The Best Comic Strips and Graphic Novelettes, 1839–1862, by David Kunzle (University Press of Mississippi)

Ed Leffingwell’s Little Joe, by Harold Gray, edited by Peter Maresca and Sammy Harkham (Sunday Press Books)

The George Herriman Library: Krazy & Ignatz 1916–1918, edited by R.J. Casey (Fantagraphics)

Krazy Kat: The Complete Color Sundays, by George Herriman, edited by Alexander Braun (TASCHEN)

Madness in Crowds: The Teeming Mind of Harrison Cady, by Violet and Denis Kitchen (Beehive Books)

Pogo, Vol. 6: Clean as a Weasel, by Walt Kelly, edited by Mark Evanier and Eric Reynolds (Fantagraphics)

Best Archival Collection/Project—Comic Books

Alay-Oop, by William Gropper (New York Review Comics)

The Complete Crepax, vol. 5: American Stories, edited by Kristy Valenti (Fantagraphics)

Jack Kirby’s Dingbat Love, edited by John Morrow (TwoMorrows)

Moonshadow: The Definitive Edition, by J. M. DeMatteis, Jon J Muth, George Pratt, Kent Williams, and others (Dark Horse Books)

Stan Sakai’s Usagi Yojimbo: The Complete Grasscutter Artist Select, by Stan Sakai, edited by Scott Dunbier (IDW)

That Miyoko Asagaya Feeling, by Shinichi Abe, translation by Ryan Holmberg, edited by Mitsuhiro Asakawa (Black Hook Press)

Best Writer

Bobby Curnow, Ghost Tree (IDW)

MK Reed and Greg Means, Penny Nichols (Top Shelf)

Mariko Tamaki, Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass (DC); Laura Dean Keeps Breaking Up with Me (First Second/Macmillan); Archie (Archie)

Lewis Trondheim, Stay (Magnetic Press); Maggy Garrisson (SelfMadeHero)

G. Willow Wilson, Invisible Kingdom (Berger Books/Dark Horse); Ms. Marvel (Marvel)

Chip Zdarsky, White Trees (Image); Daredevil, Spider-Man: Life Story (Marvel); Afterlift (comiXology Originals)

Best Writer/Artist

Nina Bunjevac, Bezimena (Fantagraphics)

Mira Jacob, Good Talk (Random House); “The Menopause” in The Believer (June 1, 2019)

Keum Suk Gendry-Kim, Grass (Drawn & Quarterly)

James Stokoe, Sobek (Shortbox)

Raina Telgemeier, Guts (Scholastic Graphix)

Tillie Walden, Are You Listening? (First Second/Macmillan)

Best Penciller/Inker or Penciller/Inker Team

Ian Bertram, Little Bird (Image)

Colleen Doran, Snow, Glass, Apples (Dark Horse)

Bilquis Evely, The Dreaming (DC)

Simon Gane, Ghost Tree (IDW)

Steve Pugh, Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass (DC)

Rosemary Valero-O'Connell, Laura Dean Keeps Breaking Up with Me (First Second/Macmillan)

Best Painter/Digital Artist

Didier Cassegrain, Black Water Lilies (Europe Comics)

Alexandre Clarisse, Diabolical Summer (IDW)

David Mack, Cover (DC)

Léa Mazé, Elma, A Bear’s Life, vol. 1: The Great Journey (Europe Comics)

Julie Rocheleau, Wrath of Fantômas (Titan)

Christian Ward, Invisible Kingdom (Berger Books/Dark Horse)

Best Cover Artist

Jen Bartel, Blackbird  (Image Comics)

Francesco Francavilla, Archie, Archie 1955, Archie Vs. Predator II, Cosmo (Archie)

David Mack, American Gods, Fight Club 3 (Dark Horse); Cover (DC)

Emma Rios, Pretty Deadly (Image)

Julian Totino Tedesco, Daredevil (Marvel)

Christian Ward, Machine Gun Wizards (Dark Horse), Invisible Kingdom (Berger Books/Dark Horse)

Best Coloring

Lorena Alvarez, Hicotea (Nobrow)

Jean-Francois Beaulieu, Middlewest, Outpost Zero (Image)

Matt Hollingsworth, Batman: Curse of the White Knight, Batman White Knight Presents Von Freeze (DC); Little Bird, November (Image)

Molly Mendoza, Skip (Nobrow)

Dave Stewart, Black Hammer, B.P.R.D.: The Devil You Know, Hellboy and the BPRD (Dark Horse); Gideon Falls (Image); Silver Surfer Black, Spider-Man (Marvel)

Best Lettering

Deron Bennett, Batgirl, Green Arrow, Justice League, Martian Manhunter (DC); Canto (IDW); Assassin Nation, Excellence (Skybound/Image); To Drink and To Eat, vol. 1 (Lion Forge); Resonant (Vault)

Jim Campbell, Black Badge, Coda (BOOM Studios); Giant Days, Lumberjanes: The Shape of Friendship (BOOM Box!); Rocko’s Modern Afterlife  (KaBOOM!); At the End of Your Tether (Lion Forge); Blade Runner 2019 (Titan); Mall, The Plot, Wasted Space (Vault)

Clayton Cowles, Aquaman, Batman, Batman and the Outsiders, Heroes in Crisis, Superman: Up in the Sky, Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen (DC); Bitter Root, Pretty Deadly, Moonstruck, Redlands, The Wicked + The Divine (Image); Reaver  (Skybound/Image); Daredevil, Ghost-Spider, Silver Surfer Black, Superior Spider-Man, Venom (Marvel)

Emilie Plateau, Colored: The Unsung Life of Claudette Colvin (Europe Comics)

Stan Sakai, Usagi Yojimbo (IDW)

Tillie Walden, Are You Listening? (First Second/Macmillan)

Best Comics-Related Periodical/Journalism

Comic Riffs blog, by Michael Cavna, www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/comics/

The Comics Journal, edited by Gary Groth, RJ Casey, and Kristy Valenti (Fantagraphics)

Hogan’s Alley, edited by Tom Heintjes (Hogan’s Alley)

Inks: The Journal of the Comics Studies Society, edited by Qiana Whitted (Ohio State University Press)

LAAB Magazine, vol. 4: This Was Your Life, edited by Ronald Wimberly and Josh O’Neill (Beehive Books)

Women Write About Comics, edited by Nola Pfau and Wendy Browne, www.WomenWriteAboutComics.com

Best Comics-Related Book

The Art of Nothing: 25 Years of Mutts and the Art of Patrick McDonnell (Abrams)

The Book of Weirdo, by Jon B. Cooke (Last Gasp)

Grunt: The Art and Unpublished Comics of James Stokoe (Dark Horse)

Logo a Gogo: Branding Pop Culture, by Rian Hughes (Korero Press)

Making Comics, by Lynda Barry (Drawn & Quarterly)

Screwball! The Cartoonists Who Made the Funnies Funny, by Paul Tumey (Library of American Comics/IDW)

Best Academic/Scholarly Work

The Art of Pere Joan: Space, Landscape, and Comics Form, by Benjamin Fraser (University of Texas Press)

The Comics of Rutu Modan: War, Love, and Secrets, by Kevin Haworth (University Press of Mississippi)

EC Comics: Race, Shock, and Social Protest, by Qiana Whitted (Rutgers University Press)

The Peanuts Papers: Writers and Cartoonists on Charlie Brown, Snoopy & the Gang, and the Meaning of Life, edited by Andrew Blauner (Library of America)

Producing Mass Entertainment: The Serial Life of the Yellow Kid, by Christina Meyer (Ohio State University Press)

Women’s Manga in Asia and Beyond: Uniting Different Cultures and Identities, edited by Fusami Ogi et al. (Palgrave Macmillan)

Best Publication Design

Grunt: The Art and Unpublished Comics of James Stokoe, designed by Ethan Kimberling (Dark Horse)

Krazy Kat: The Complete Color Sundays, by George Herriman, designed by Anna-Tina Kessler (TASCHEN)

Logo a Gogo, designed by Rian Hughes (Korero Press)

Madness in Crowds: The Teeming Mind of Harrison Cady, designed by Paul Kopple and Alex Bruce (Beehive Books)

Making Comics, designed by Lynda Barry (Drawn & Quarterly)

Rusty Brown, designed by Chris Ware (Pantheon)

Best Digital Comic

Afterlift, by Chip Zdarsky and Jason Loo (comiXology Originals)

Black Water Lilies, by Michel Bussi, adapted by Frédéric Duval and Didier Cassegrain, translated by Edward Gauvin (Europe Comics)

Colored: The Unsung Life of Claudette Colvin, by Tania de Montaigne, adapted by Emilie Plateau, translated by Montana Kane (Europe Comics)

Elma, A Bear’s Life, vol. 1: The Great Journey, by Ingrid Chabbert and Léa Mazé, translated by Jenny Aufiery (Europe Comics)

Mare Internum, by Der-shing Helmer (comiXology; gumroad.com/l/MIPDF)

Tales from Behind the Window, by Edanur Kuntman, translated by Cem Ulgen (Europe Comics)

Best Webcomic

Cabramatta, by Matt Huynh, http://believermag.com/cabramatta/

Chuckwagon at the End of the World, by Erik Lundy, https://hollowlegcomics.tumblr.com/chuckwagon 

The Eyes, by Javi de Castro, https://www.javidecastro.com/theeyes

Fried Rice Comic, by Erica Eng, https://friedricecomic.tumblr.com

 reMIND, by Jason Brubaker, https://is.gd/T7rafM

Third Shift Society, by Meredith Moriarty, https://www.webtoons.com/en/supernatural/third-shift-society/list?title_no=1703

Speaking of San Diego Comic Con, even though it’s not on this year. They are presenting a virtual version with Comi-con@home beginning on  Wednesday, July 22nd. and running to the 26th. It will include panels, giveaways, news, and more. You’ll also be able to print out your own con badge best of all it’s completely free. In a statement, SCC Spokesman David Glanzer said quote “For the first time in our 50-year history, we are happy to welcome virtually anyone from around the globe,” said SDCC spokesperson David Glanzer. “Though stay-at-home conditions makes this a very difficult time, we see this as an opportunity to spread some joy and strengthen our sense of community.” unquote I’m guessing this will not be a good excuse not to go to work.

Disney is moving another movie straight to Disney Plus instead of theaters. The one and Only Ivan is based on a 2012 children's book by KA Applegate. The film mixes Live action and CGI to tell the story of Ivan, a 400 pound gorilla played by Sam rockwell who lives in an enclosure in a suburban mall with Stella the elephant played by Angelina Jolie and Bob the dog played by Danny Devito. Ivan starts to remember his life in the jungle with a new baby elephant named Ruby arrives, played by Brooklyn Prince. The movie comes to Disney Plus on August 21st.

Genius Brands International has named former CEO of the Fox Kids Networks Margaret Loesch as executive chair of its new online ad-supported streaming service Kartoon Channel! Which launched this week. The Kartoon Channel (which is Kartoon with a K) will offer over 4,000 episodes of content from Genius Brands catalog including Warren Buffett’s Secret Millionaires Club, Thomas Edison’s Secret Lab, Baby Genius, Martha Stewart & Friends, Stan Lee’s Mighty 7, Gisele Bündchen’s Gisele & The Green Team, Gummi Bears, Shark Academy, DaJammies, Amber the Ambulance, Dino the Dinosaur, Ethan the Dump Truck, IncrediTales, OneZeez and Super Geek Heroes  The streaming service is aimed at kids 2 to eleven and should be carried on all platforms. 


In an attempt to help draw customers back to comic book shops and maybe mitigate some of the financial hardships caused by the coronavirus pandemic, AfterShock Comics is putting out a special, 48-page anthology comic, Support Our Shops (S.O.S.).


The comic will be provided free to stores, tand will showcase works from such writers as Zac Thompson, Jamie McKelvie, Jerry Ordway, Cullen Bunn and Aaron Douglasand artists Gordon Purcell, Leila Leiz, Szymon Kundranski, Ro Stein and Ted Brandt, Cliff Richards and Don Kramer; with cover art by David Mack. Publisher Joe Pruett in a statement said quote  "This benefit book celebrates the central and critical role that comic shops have always played in fostering a love of the medium among fans – many of whom have gone on to become creators in their own right," "It might be a drop in the bucket, but it's a hell of a drop in the bucket. These are heartfelt stories, crafted by creators with deep, lasting connections to the comic shops of yesterday, today and, we have no doubt, tomorrow."unquote 


Comic book stores that rank among Diamond's top 200 AfterShock accounts will receive 20 free copies of S.O.S. per storefront with June 24 orders. Ten free copies will go to the next 300 stores in the rankings. Any stores that are not among the rankings may still request copies of S.O.S.. The aim is for comic book store owners to either give away the copies or sell them at a suggested price to make up for recent losses.


Tonight we say Goodbye and Thank you to Dennis “Denny” O’Neil. Denny is legendary and some would say that he was as important to DC as Stan Lee was to Marvel. He not only shaped Batman from the ’70s to the 90’s as the Batman group editor.  He along with Neal Adams shaped Green Lantern and Green Arrow, using the characters to tackle racism, poverty, and a variety of topics. Denny was born in May 1939 and got started in comics as Stan Lee’s assistant in the mid-’60s. He would later that decade start writing for Charlton Comics with occasional work for DC and Marvel. IN the 70’s he and Adams were tasked with bringing the Dark Knight out of the campiness that the 60’s Batman tv show had let it into. The duo brought Batman back to the original that Bill Finger and Bob Kane created, leaning into the dark, gothic and mysterious elements of Batman and Gotham City. There work is with us today in every modern Batman movie.


His work on the Green Lantern/Green Arrow series put Hal Jordan in the role of cosmic cop to Oliver Queen’s protester, both spending time showing each that the world was not just black and white but shades of grey He also did runs of Superman, Green Lantern, The Flash, Wonder Woman, and The Question. He also wrote episodes of Batman The Animated Series, Gi Joe, Logans Run, and Superboy


Later, Denny would co-create Azrael with Joe Quesada, he also created Ra's al Ghul (and his daughter Talia), Leslie Thompkins, and Richard Dragon and leading Batman through Knightfall, he even wrote the novelization, which I happen to own a copy, he called Knightfall one of the more interesting experiences of his life. He did do some work outside of DC and Marvel.  His graphic novel of The Shadow 1941 for Dynamite was so great, his friend and colleague Rick Stasi said quote I couldn't pick just one aspect of Denny's contributions. His SHADOW was phenomenal work! No one handled The Shadow like Denny! Unquote He also wrote novellas that have been published in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, Fantasy & Science Fiction, Unknown Worlds of Science Fiction and Fantastic Stories.


Denny never lost his love for comics, he wrote the DC Guide to Writing Comics and taught a comics writing course at Manhattan’s School of Visual Arts. He was also a multiple award winner winning multiple Shazam Awards, several Goethe Awards, and a two-time Inkpot Award winner.


Dennis “Denny” O’Neil died on June 11th from natural causes, he was 81 years old. His final work is in the Joker 80th Anniversary special. 



And that brings us to the end of the comic book news. *Show Ender*

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